Ezekiel Bible Study

Ezekiel ~ Lesson 16

Previous Lessons: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

Read Ezekiel 35-37

Questions to Consider

1. Review your notes from our last lesson and be reminded of the things that lead into, and set the stage for, this week’s passage.

2. Using a good Bible map of your choosing, attempt to locate all of the geographical places mentioned in 35-37. Where were each of these places in relation to Israel?

3. Read chapter 35. Explain why God is exercising judgment against Mount Seir and Edom. (Don’t forget to use your cross references.) How might you use a passage like chapter 35 to help explain God’s justice and judgment to a friend who believes in the false teaching of universalism– that God just forgives everyone and lets them into Heaven when they die?

4. Read chapter 36. Why does God tell Ezekiel to prophesy to mountains in chapters 35-36 instead of people? What is God explaining to Israel in 36:1-7?

When God told Israel He was judging the pagan nations around them, what should Israel’s response have been? One day, God will pour out His wrath on those who have persecuted His church. How should we, as Christians, respond to Him when He does?

How do 36: 5 and 6 help you to understand the concept of God’s holy jealousy?

How does 36:8-15 paint a picture of God forgiving His people?

If God is God, and the truth about His nature and character is eventually going to win out anyway, why is He concerned for the reputation of His name in 36:16-21? Why does God care what pagans think of Him?

We’ve learned in previous studies that “therefore” (36:22) acts as a pivot point, or “hinge” verse connecting what comes before it with what comes after it. Which two concepts does 36:22 connect?

Why (6:22,32) is God choosing to act the way he describes in 6:22-38? Is it fair and biblical to say that everything God does, He does first and foremost for His own glory, and secondarily for the good of the people involved? Why or why not? How does it benefit people when God acts on behalf of His own glory?

Compare God’s actions and posture toward Israel in 6:22-38 to God’s actions and posture toward Christians as He goes about the work of saving sinners. How does God save people? Why does God save people? What are the results of God saving people?

Explain the differences between “you shall know that I am the Lord” in chapter 35 and “you shall know that I am the Lord” in chapter 36. How is knowing that God is the Lord by experiencing His wrath for your unrepentant sin and rebellion different from knowing God is the Lord by experiencing His forgiveness of sin when you repent?

5. Read chapter 37. Explain how the valley of dry bones (37:1-14) is a dramatization of the promises God made to Israel in 36:22-38.

Compare 37:1-14 with these passages, and explain how the valley of dry bones points ahead to salvation in Christ. Imagine you’re Ezekiel. You’ve just gone through the valley of dry bones experience, and God transports you ahead in time to watch and listen as Jesus raises Lazarus. How does the latter event give you a more fully-orbed understanding of the former?

Is 37:15-28 a “near” prophecy (something that will happen right away Ezekiel’s original audience) or a “far” prophecy (something that will happen far in the future, perhaps in eternity), or a bit of both? Cite the verses that back up your answer.

Have all of the things in 37:15-28 happened already? What is the significance of God’s use of the words “forever” and “forevermore”? (37:25-27) Who is “My servant David”? (37:24-25)

What does 37:15-28 make you look forward to in eternity?


Homework

• Add 35:4,9,12,15, 36:11,23,36,38, 37:6,13,14,28 to your “And you/they shall know that I am the Lord” list. Write down who will know that He is the Lord, what will cause them to know He is the Lord, and why God wants them to know He is the Lord.


Suggested Memory Verse

Ezekiel Bible Study

Ezekiel ~ Catch Up Week

Previous Lessons: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

Catch Up Week

I’m out of pocket this week, so you get a catch up week!

Catch up on any lessons you might be behind on, go back and do any of the homework you may not have had time for, review your memory verses, or if you’re already caught up, you could even read ahead in Ezekiel a little. It’s your week to use as you see fit.

Unless something unexpected happens, I am planning for us to finish up Ezekiel before Thanksgiving. (After that, there will be no weekly Bible study until after the holidays, so if one catch up week won’t do it, you’ll still have plenty of time to finish at your own pace.)

Ezekiel Bible Study

Ezekiel ~ Lesson 15

Previous Lessons: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

Read Ezekiel 33-34

Questions to Consider

1. Review your notes from last week’s lesson and be reminded of the things that lead into, and set the stage for, this week’s passage.

2. Read 33:1-9. What was the purpose of a (literal) watchman in Ezekiel’s day? Explain God’s charge to Ezekiel in this passage. Who was he to warn, and what was he to warn them about? What would be the consequences for Ezekiel for not warning the people as God commanded? What would be the result for him if he did obey God’s command to warn them?

Are there any general principles we can draw from this passage about our responsibility to share the gospel with the lost? What about confronting sin in a fellow Christian or warning the church against false teachers? Are the consequences Ezekiel faced for warning/not warning the same for Christians warning/not warning against sin and unbelief? Which New Testament Scriptures can you think of that would seem to be in line with, or would indicate a difference from, 33:1-9 for Christians?

Why do God’s people, in Ezekiel’s day and now, need watchmen? What does this passage teach us about God’s perspective on sin and repentance?

3. Did 33:1-9 or the questions in #2 ring a bell? That’s because God originally called Ezekiel to be a watchman for Israel back in chapter 3. Review your answers to #2 in lesson 3 (link above) and compare them to your answers to #2 here. What are the differences or similarities between 3:16-21 and 33:1-9? Why do you think God addressed this twice? (Hint: Who is God’s message for in 3:16 and 33:2?)

4. Read 33:10-20. Explain the heart of God toward sinners. Does God delight or take joy in exercising His wrath against sinners? What is His posture toward sinners? How does this passage explain repentance and God’s forgiveness of sin? How does it showcase God’s mercy toward sinners?

This passage talks a great deal about people’s wicked or righteous behavior. Is this chapter teaching works righteousness (that we can earn right standing with God by our good behavior or obeying His laws)? How do you know – based on specific Scriptures and the fact that the Bible doesn’t contradict itself – that it is not? What is the spiritual motivation for the righteous behavior described in this passage?

Is 33:18 saying that a person can lose her salvation? How do you know – based on specific Scriptures and the fact that the Bible doesn’t contradict itself – that it is not?

How does 33:18-19 show that God’s way of reckoning sin and righteousness is just and Israel’s way is unjust (33:17, 20)?

Imagine you’re one of the few faithful Israelites during this time. You love the Lord and do your best to obey Him. How would this passage comfort you and reassure you as you keep hearing these messages of God’s impending wrath?

5. Did 33:10-20 or the questions in #4 seem familiar? That’s because God already communicated this message, in greater detail, in chapter 18. Review your answers to #3 in lesson 9 (link above) and compare them to your answers to #4 here. What are the differences or similarities between chapter 18 and 33:10-20? Why do you think God addressed this twice?

6. Read 33:21-33. Apparently a few people fled to the wilderness on the outskirts of Jerusalem and hid there when the city fell. Think about all the wrath God has poured out on Jerusalem thus far. Why would any Israelite in his right mind still think he would have possession of the land? How does God spell things out for them in 33:25-29?

Are there any New Testament passages that come to mind as you read 33:30-33? Compare 33:30-33 with these passages and any others you thought of. How does this demonstrate the principle that those who truly love God will obey Him? What are your thoughts on this principle?

7. Read chapter 34. This chapter contains both “near” prophecy (“right now” meaning and application for Ezekiel and Israel) and “far” prophecy (meaning and application for God’s people far in the future).

Who is/are the following, and what is happening with each of them in the “near” prophecy of Ezekiel’s day?

The shepherds

The sheep (34:31)-

The wild beasts-

Reading this passage through the lens of “far” prophecy, who is “my servant David” (34:23-24)?

Carefully examine 33:25-31. Has any of this passage been fulfilled yet, either for the nation of Israel or for the church? If so, which parts? What does this passage point ahead to in general?

Compare chapter 34 to the following passages and any other shepherd/sheep motif passages you’re familiar with. How does God shepherd His people? In what ways is Jesus the Good Shepherd? How are we, His people similar to sheep? How are false teachers of today aptly described by chapter 34?

Psalm 23

John 10:1-18

John 21:15-17

1 Peter 5:1-4

What are some ways the church today can properly apply chapter 34 to itself?


Homework

• Add 33:29, 34:27, 30 to your “And you/they shall know that I am the Lord” list. Write down who will know that He is the Lord, what will cause them to know He is the Lord, and why God wants them to know He is the Lord.


Suggested Memory Verse

Ezekiel Bible Study

Ezekiel ~ Lesson 14

Previous Lessons: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

Read Ezekiel 29-32

Questions to Consider

1. Review your notes from last week’s lesson and be reminded of the things that lead into, and set the stage for, this week’s passage. From any previous knowledge of the Old Testament you may have, what were some of the connections between Israel and Egypt on various occasions? What was the relationship between these two nations like?

2. Read chapters 29-32. Write a 2-3 sentence summary of this passage. How is the general theme of last week’s passage the same as the general theme of this week’s passage?

3. Using a good Old Testament map, locate Egypt, the Nile River, and any of the other cities or geographical locations mentioned in this passage (if possible). Where were these located in relation to Israel? Recall from lesson 10 (link above) what God said about Israel’s reputation in the eyes of the pagan nations surrounding them.

If you’re not familiar with ancient Egyptian life, religion, and culture, give this brief article a read. (Note- this is not a Christian site. On a totally unrelated note- if you homeschool, you may find this to be a helpful teaching site.)

3. Break this passage down into the sins Egypt committed and the God’s judgment for those sins:

Sin (29:6b-7)-
Judgment (29:8-9a)-

Sin (29:9b)-
Judgment (29:10-16)-

Sin (30:13a)-
Judgment (30:13b-19- The places listed in this passage are cities in Egypt.)-

Sin (32:2)-
Judgment (32:3-15)-

4. Compare what you know of the splendor, power, and influence of Egypt before God’s judgment in 29:13-16 to Egypt’s status after 29:13-16, even to what you know about Egypt’s status today. Has God kept the promise He made in that passage? Considering Egypt’s power and influence over much of the known world in ancient times, what is the significance of God’s judgment on Egypt’s allies in 30:5-9?

5. 29:17-20: What is God referring to here about Tyre? Refresh your memory by reviewing lesson 13 (link above). Whom did God use to carry out His judgment on Egypt? Why? (also 30:10-12, 20-26)

6. (The key to understanding chapter 31 is to understand who God is talking to, to whom He is comparing them, and what similarities between the two are causing God to make the comparison.) Who is God talking to? (31:2,18d) To whom is God comparing Egypt? (31:3a) What similarities between Assyria’s (31:3-10) and Egypt’s power and their influence on Israel would cause God to compare them and their fate to one another?

7. In chapter 32, what does “uncircumcised” signify about all of these people groups? What do “to the world below, to those who have gone down to the pit” (32:18) and “Sheol” (32:21) indicate about the fate of Egypt, Assyria, and all the other peoples mentioned in 32:20-32?

8. How do these chapters point us toward the following concepts:

  • God punishes sin.
  • The uncircumcised of heart will spend eternity experiencing God’s wrath and judgment.
  • Might does not make right when it comes to our relationship with God.
  • The bigger they are, the harder they fall. / Pride goeth before a fall.
  • Sinners must humble themselves, repent, and throw themselves on the mercy of God for salvation.

9. What can we learn from Egypt about the sins of pride, idolatry, and sitting in the seat of God (29:3b,9b) in our own lives? What are the opposites of these sins – the things we should be doing instead?

10. In what way(s) does this passage point us to Christ?


Homework

• Add 29:6,9,16,21, 30:8,19,25,26, and 32:15 to your “And you/they shall know that I am the Lord” list. Write down who will know that He is the Lord, what will cause them to know He is the Lord, and why God wants them to know He is the Lord.


Suggested Memory Verse

Ezekiel Bible Study

Ezekiel ~ Lesson 13

Previous Lessons: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Read Ezekiel 26-28

Questions to Consider

1. Review your notes from last week’s lesson and be reminded of the things that lead into, and set the stage for, this week’s passage.

2. Read chapters 26-28. Using a good Old Testament map, locate Tyre, Sidon, and any of the other cities or geographical locations mentioned (if possible). Where were these located in relation to Israel? Recall from lesson 10 (link above) what God said about Israel’s reputation in the eyes of the pagan nations surrounding them.

Read this article. If you are unfamiliar with Tyre, it will help shed some light on this passage.

3. What did Tyre do that brought God’s judgment upon them? (26:2, 27:3b, 28:2-6, 17a) What were the consequences of their actions? (26:3-21) 

4. What metaphor does God use to describe Tyre’s beauty, power, and influence in 27:4-9? How was Tyre the “flagship” city of its time and region? (27:10-25)

Why would the surrounding nations be so appalled at the downfall of Tyre? (27:28-32,35-36)

5. What did Sidon do that brought God’s judgment upon them? (28:24) What were the consequences of their actions? (28:22-23)

6. List the passages in chapters 26-28 which bear out the truths of “The bigger they are, the harder they fall,” and “Pride goes before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall,” (Proverbs 16:18):

The bigger they are… / Pride/a haughty spirit go before…



…the harder they fall. / …a fall.



7. After studying God’s judgment and wrath against Israel for their heinous sins over the past several lessons, why do you think God would exercise judgment against pagan peoples like Tyre for coming against Israel? (28:24) Think about this through the lens of the parent-child relationship, in which God, the Father, is disciplining His rebellious child, Israel. When you are disciplining your own child for her sin, does that mean you are OK with other people being abusive toward her? Why or why not? What is God’s long term goal for exercising judgment against Israel’s neighbors who have stood against her? (28:25-26)

8. What can we learn from Tyre and Sidon about the sins of pride, idolizing wealth and power, trusting in wealth and power instead of trusting in God, and failing to give God thanks and glory for how He has blessed us and the work He has done in our lives?

9. Compare God’s wrath against Tyre and Sidon for pridefully trusting in themselves rather than God to the judgment that awaits individuals, who, in their pride and rebellion think in their hearts, “I sit in the seat of God (28:2) over my own life.” What will be their eternal fate? How should this inform our evangelism?


Homework

• Add 26:6, 28:22, 23, 24, 26 to your “And you/they shall know that I am the Lord” list. Write down who will know that He is the Lord, what will cause them to know He is the Lord, and why God wants them to know He is the Lord.


Suggested Memory Verse