Ezekiel Bible Study

Ezekiel ~ Lesson 13

Previous Lessons: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Read Ezekiel 26-28

Questions to Consider

1. Review your notes from last week’s lesson and be reminded of the things that lead into, and set the stage for, this week’s passage.

2. Read chapters 26-28. Using a good Old Testament map, locate Tyre, Sidon, and any of the other cities or geographical locations mentioned (if possible). Where were these located in relation to Israel? Recall from lesson 10 (link above) what God said about Israel’s reputation in the eyes of the pagan nations surrounding them.

Read this article. If you are unfamiliar with Tyre, it will help shed some light on this passage.

3. What did Tyre do that brought God’s judgment upon them? (26:2, 27:3b, 28:2-6, 17a) What were the consequences of their actions? (26:3-21) 

4. What metaphor does God use to describe Tyre’s beauty, power, and influence in 27:4-9? How was Tyre the “flagship” city of its time and region? (27:10-25)

Why would the surrounding nations be so appalled at the downfall of Tyre? (27:28-32,35-36)

5. What did Sidon do that brought God’s judgment upon them? (28:24) What were the consequences of their actions? (28:22-23)

6. List the passages in chapters 26-28 which bear out the truths of “The bigger they are, the harder they fall,” and “Pride goes before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall,” (Proverbs 16:18):

The bigger they are… / Pride/a haughty spirit go before…



…the harder they fall. / …a fall.



7. After studying God’s judgment and wrath against Israel for their heinous sins over the past several lessons, why do you think God would exercise judgment against pagan peoples like Tyre for coming against Israel? (28:24) Think about this through the lens of the parent-child relationship, in which God, the Father, is disciplining His rebellious child, Israel. When you are disciplining your own child for her sin, does that mean you are OK with other people being abusive toward her? Why or why not? What is God’s long term goal for exercising judgment against Israel’s neighbors who have stood against her? (28:25-26)

8. What can we learn from Tyre and Sidon about the sins of pride, idolizing wealth and power, trusting in wealth and power instead of trusting in God, and failing to give God thanks and glory for how He has blessed us and the work He has done in our lives?

9. Compare God’s wrath against Tyre and Sidon for pridefully trusting in themselves rather than God to the judgment that awaits individuals, who, in their pride and rebellion think in their hearts, “I sit in the seat of God (28:2) over my own life.” What will be their eternal fate? How should this inform our evangelism?


Homework

• Add 26:6, 28:22, 23, 24, 26 to your “And you/they shall know that I am the Lord” list. Write down who will know that He is the Lord, what will cause them to know He is the Lord, and why God wants them to know He is the Lord.


Suggested Memory Verse

Ezekiel Bible Study

Ezekiel ~ Lesson 12

 

Previous Lessons: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

Read Ezekiel 24-25

Questions to Consider

1. Review your notes from last week’s lesson and be reminded of the things that lead into, and set the stage for, this week’s passage. How does the theme of chapters 22-23 give us background for the beginning of chapter 24? What is the setting for chapter 24? (24:2) Recall- where is Ezekiel right now that God has to tell him what’s happening in Jerusalem?

2. Usually, when God has Ezekiel warn the people through a parable, He gives the explanation of the parable afterwards. This time, God gives the explanation beforehand, in 24:2b. What is the general idea this parable in 24:3-14 is about? Read 24:1-14 in through the lens of 24:2b to help you understand it, and be sure to use your cross-references as you read.

(If you do not understand the Old Testament concept and tactics of siege as a military attack strategy, I would strongly recommend that you read this article.)

It may also help you understand 24:1-14 better to get a particular visual in your head: Which city is being besieged in this parable? (24:2b) And by what was Jerusalem completely encircled? Picture that structure: a piece of land with a wall around its circumference. Now picture one of your cooking pots – a flat bottom with “walls” around its circumference. See the structural similarity? So, if Jerusalem is the “pot,” what is in the pot? (24:4-5) What does the fire underneath the pot (24:10) represent? (Hint: In lesson 10 {link above} we recalled that God’s _____ is often represented by fire.) Once the fire of God’s wrath is lit by the Babylonian siege, what’s going to happen to the Israelites in the “pot” of Jerusalem?

What does it mean that the “pot” has “corrosion” in it? (24:6, 11-12) What is God going to do to the “pot” because of that corrosion? (24:11-14)

In 24:7-8, use your cross-references and explain the significance of the blood shed in Jerusalem being “poured out on the bare rock” instead of poured out on the ground and covered. (Hint: Think back to the concept of shame over sin from lesson 10 {link above}.) Since Israel has shed blood publicly and unashamedly, how will God execute His wrath upon them (24:8)? Think about this passage in light of your own repentance for sin and Christ’s blood covering your sin and shame. Look at 24:13: “I would have cleansed you…” and compare this with 18:23, 31-32 (you may also want to revisit lesson 9 {link above}). Describe God’s heart toward the sinner. Does He take pleasure in exercising wrath against sinners?

3. Read 24:15-27. Explain in your own words what would happen to Ezekiel’s wife, how Ezekiel would act in response, and what this was to communicate to the people. Use your cross-references to understand why things like putting on his turban and shoes would have seemed strange to the people for someone whose wife had just died. Why would God not allow the people to mourn over the desecration of temple and the loss of the sons and daughters they had left behind in Jerusalem when they went into exile?

4. Read chapter 25. Using a good Old Testament map, locate Ammon, Moab/Seir, Edom, and Philistia, and any of the other cities or geographical locations mentioned. Where were these located in relation to Israel? Recall from lesson 10 (link above) what God said about Israel’s reputation in the eyes of the pagan nations surrounding them.

What was the main sin God judged each of these nations for, and what was their punishment?

Ammon (25:1-7)-

Moab/Seir (25:8-11)-

Edom (25:12-14)-

Philistia (25:15-17)-

Consider the mockery of God’s people by Ammon, and the punishment God meted out for this mockery, and compare this to the New Testament mentions of mockers and scoffers against Jesus, Christians, and the church.

5. What group of people is God exercising His wrath upon in chapter 24? In chapter 25? When it comes to God’s wrath against sin, if you’re an unrepentant sinner does it matter whether or not you say you’re one of God’s people? Does God view you any differently than a pagan?


Homework

• Add 24:24, 27, and 25:5, 7, 11, 17 to your “And you/they shall know that I am the Lord” list. Write down who will know that He is the Lord, what will cause them to know He is the Lord, and why God wants them to know He is the Lord.

• Think about God’s Father/child relationship to Israel in light of earthly parent/child relationships (if you don’t have children, think back to when you were a child or think about other parents you know). When your child has misbehaved, have you ever said, “I expect better from you than that,” or, “You know better than that.”? What did you mean when you said that? Explain why God would take that same posture with His “child,” Israel, compared with His “I might have expected that from the neighbor kid,” posture toward the pagan nations surrounding Israel.


Suggested Memory Verse

Ezekiel Bible Study

Ezekiel ~ Lesson 11

 

Previous Lessons: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

Read Ezekiel 22-23

Questions to Consider

1. Review your notes from last week’s lesson and be reminded of the things that lead into, and set the stage for, this week’s passage.

2.  Read chapter 22.

Which city is “the bloody city”? (22:2) How did it earn this nickname? (22:3,4,6)

Make a list of every sin God charges people with in this chapter:

The People’s (Israel’s) Sin

 

 

 

The Princes’ Sin

 

The Prophets’ Sin

 

The Priests’ Sin

 

How does listing out these sins impact you? What impact should it have had on each of these groups of people for their sins to be publicly enumerated and exposed? How did God say the surrounding nations would regard Israel? (22:4-5,16) What was God’s desired end result in publicly shaming these groups of people? Is shame always a bad thing? Has feeling guilty or ashamed over a sin ever led you to repent of that sin?

3. Explain the dross metaphor in 22:17-22. Why do you think God’s wrath is so often compared to fire in Scripture?

4. Compare the false prophets and sinning priests in 22:25-28 to false teachers and wayward pastors today. What are some similarities and/or differences you see? What about false teachers (for example, Paula White) who advise governmental leaders (22:28)?

5. Take a moment and let 22:30 really sink in. When God searched for a righteous man to stand in the breach in Genesis 6, how many did He find? In Genesis 18-19? Read 2 Chronicles 16:9a. Contemplate the weight of Israel’s sin and the level of depravity they had sunk to as you consider that they were God’s covenant people – not pagans, as in the stories of Noah and Lot  –  and God could not find a single righteous person in their midst.

6. Read chapter 23. (Brace yourself, this chapter is not for the faint of heart. If you are doing this study with a younger child, you may want to read the chapter first and consider how you will address the adult themes it contains.)

Were Oholah and Oholibah real people, or is this story a parable/metaphor? (23:4b) What do each of the “sisters” represent? (23:4b)

Explain “Oholah’s” sin in your own words. (23:5-10)

Explain “Oholibah’s” sin in your own words. (23:11-21). How did Oholibah’s sin compare to Oholah’s sin? (23:11)

Why does God use such gross and explicit (yet, non-sinful) language to describe Samaria’s and Jerusalem’s sin? (23:5-21, 36-45) What does this teach us about how God views sin, and thus, how we should view sin? What was God’s response to their sin? (23:18) Consider the amount of sin Jesus bore in His body on the tree – far more than just the sins of chapter 23. How does God’s response to sin in 23:18 help you better understand Mark 15:34? Have you ever been as disgusted by your own sin as you were when you read the depiction of sin in chapter 23? Why or why not?

7. Describe the consequences 23:22-35, 46-49 spells out for Jerusalem and Samaria. Compare these consequences to the depiction of Jerusalem’s sin earlier in the chapter. Is God being unfair or punishing Jerusalem too harshly? What do these consequences tell us about how seriously God takes sin? Does God take your sin just as seriously as He took Jerusalem’s sin? Why or why not? If God was willing to execute judgment this extreme against sin on earth, what does that tell you about the judgment He will exercise against unbelievers in eternity? What does it tell you about the mercy and grace of God that Christ absorbed this extreme wrath and judgment against your sin in your place? Think about how you might convey these ideas to someone you’re sharing the gospel with.

8. Why does God consider idolatry to be spiritual adultery? (23:37) Have you ever considered your own sins of idolatry as spiritual adultery?

9. How should these horrific descriptions of sin, wrath, and judgment lead Christians to worship God and  be thankful to Him?


Homework

• Add 22:16, 22 and 23:49 to your “And you/they shall know that I am the Lord” list. Write down who will know that He is the Lord, what will cause them to know He is the Lord, and why God wants them to know He is the Lord.

• Read my article Guilt and Shame- Burden or Blessing?, and consider any biblically appropriate or biblically inappropriate guilt and shame you may be experiencing, and what your godly response should be.

• Note how many times in these chapters that God talks about the sin of “disregarding” His Sabbaths. Compare this to Hebrews 10:24-25. Which principles (if any) regarding God’s wrath toward those disregarding His Sabbaths, apply to New Testament Christians forsaking the gathering of the church body?


Suggested Memory Verse

Ezekiel Bible Study

Ezekiel ~ Lesson 10

 

Previous Lessons: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Read Ezekiel 20-21

Questions to Consider

1. Review your notes from last week’s lesson and be reminded of the things that lead into, and set the stage for, this week’s passage.

2. Read 20:1-44. Outline the main “bullet points” of what is happening in this passage:

20:1-

20:2-3-

20:4-29

20:30-44

3. In 20:5-29, God takes the elders of Israel who have come to inquire of Him via Ezekiel (20:1) on a “stroll down memory lane”. Summarize each of the historical events God reminds them of:

20:5-10-

20:11-17-

20:18-26

20:27-29

Do you notice a pattern, or cycle, to the interactions between God and His people?

God does _______.

Israel does _______.

God’s anger is kindled.

God does _______.

How does this pattern fit each of the events above?

Do you notice any recurring actions or reactions/responses on the part of God or Israel in these passages? Explain.

What are the three main sins of Israel that God highlights in these passages? (20:16) Why does Israel commit the same sins over and over again? Do you find yourself committing the same sins again and again? Why?

In 20:8-9, 13b-14, and 21b-22, what is God’s initial posture toward Israel’s sin? But then what does He actually do? Why? Was God showing mercy to Israel because they “deserved” it? What does it mean that God acted the way He did “for the sake of His name”? What kind of reputation did God want to have in the eyes of the pagan nations surrounding Israel? Why?

One of the heretical teachings of the New Apostolic Reformation is that God is hamstrung by our actions. Like, if we have all of our spiritual ducks in a row, God is obligated to do what we want Him to do, as though He had no choice in the matter. Explain how the inverse in this passage (Israel sins, so God is obligated to punish them, but, instead, shows them mercy for His name’s sake) disproves this idea. Aside from God’s promises, do our actions absolutely determine God’s actions in a given situation? Why not?

4. In 20:30-44, God turns from His recitation of history to presently addressing the elders of Israel who have come to inquire of Him. Explain why He says they may not inquire of Him. (20:30-31) Compare 20:30-44 with 20:4-29. What is the point of comparison God is trying to drive home to these elders? (20:36) How does this fit with the cliche “Those who will not learn from history are doomed to repeat it.”? In what ways have you learned from your past experiences with sin so that you will not repeat those sins?

5. Read 20:45-21:7

To what does God tell Ezekiel to prophesy in 20:46 and 21:2? Why would God tell him to prophesy against geographical locations instead of people? What does He mean by doing so?

Meditate on 21:6-7 for a moment- how should Ezekiel’s response inform the way we regard those who are lost and facing God’s judgment in Hell? How could this kind of regard for the lost impact our evangelism?

6. Read 21:8-32

Consider God’s “father-child” relationship with Israel. What does it mean that Israel has “despised the rod” (21:10b, 13)? Since they despised the rod, they will receive the ________. What does the sword (21:9-17) represent?

Whose “sword” will God use to exercise His wrath against Israel? (21:18) Who else is God using their sword against? (21:20). When God tells Ezekiel to “mark a way” and “make a signpost” for the sword (21:19-20), what does that tell you about His attitude regarding the Babylonians laying siege to Israel and the Ammonites? What will be the outcome for Israel? (21:24-27) For the Ammonites? (21:28-32)

7. Compare God’s discipline of Israel in these two chapters with God’s discipline of Christians. What are some similarities and/or differences you see? What do these chapters teach us about sin, God’s discipline of His children, His wrath against sin, and His desire that His sinning children be reconciled to Him?


Homework

• Add 20:12, 20, 26, 38, 42, 44, 21:5, 16, 22 to your “And you/they shall know that I am the Lord” list. Write down who will know that He is the Lord, what will cause them to know He is the Lord, and why God wants them to know He is the Lord.

• Ezekiel 21:32 says of the Ammonites: “You shall be no more remembered, for I the Lord have spoken.” In some instances, God has said this kind of thing about a certain people group or nation, and, to this day, no historical or archaeological evidence of their existence can be found outside of Scripture. Do a little research. Has any historical or archaeological evidence been found for the Ammonites?


Suggested Memory Verse

Ezekiel Bible Study

Ezekiel ~ Catch Up Week

 

Previous Lessons: 12345678, 9

It’s Catch Up Week!

I’m out of pocket this week, so you get a catch up week!

Catch up on any lessons you might be behind on, go back and do any of the homework you may not have had time for, review your memory verses, or if you’re already caught up, you could even read ahead in Ezekiel a little (we got through the end of Ezekiel 19 in lesson 9). It’s your week to use as you see fit.

Memory verses for review (there was no memory verse for lesson 1):

Lesson 2

 

Lesson 3

 

Lesson 4

 

Lesson 5

 

Lesson 6

 

Lesson 7

 

Lesson 8

 

Lesson 9